Collection Braglia


The collection of Gabriele and Anna Braglia prides itself on including over two hundred and fifty works of art by both Italian and international artists.

The Braglia Collection: over 250 works of art

The collection of Gabriele and Anna Braglia prides itself on including over two hundred and fifty works of art by both Italian (among which Giacomo Balla, Alberto Burri, Giuseppe Cesetti, Giorgio de Chirico, Fortunato Depero, Lucio Fontana, Amedeo Modigliani, Giorgio Morandi, Mimmo Paladino, Gino Severini, Mario Sironi, Lorenzo Viani) and international artists of great interest (Arman, Jean-Michel Basquiat, Fernando Botero, Marc Chagall, Christo, Salvador Dalí, Peter Doig, Max Ernst, Fernand Léger, René Magritte, Joan Mirò, Pablo Picasso Manolo Valdés, Andy Warhol and many others).

Of great interest is also the group of almost 70 works by Italian-Slovenian painter Anton Zoran Music.

The Braglia Collection: over 250 works of art

The collection of Gabriele and Anna Braglia prides itself on including over two hundred and fifty works of art by both Italian (among which Giacomo Balla, Alberto Burri, Giuseppe Cesetti, Giorgio de Chirico, Fortunato Depero, Lucio Fontana, Amedeo Modigliani, Giorgio Morandi, Mimmo Paladino, Gino Severini, Mario Sironi, Lorenzo Viani) and international artists of great interest (Arman, Jean-Michel Basquiat, Fernando Botero, Marc Chagall, Christo, Salvador Dalí, Peter Doig, Max Ernst, Fernand Léger, René Magritte, Joan Mirò, Pablo Picasso Manolo Valdés, Andy Warhol and many others).

Of great interest is also the group of almost 70 works by Italian-Slovenian painter Anton Zoran Music.

From the nineties Gabriele and Anna have focused on German Expressionism artwork. This significant part of the collection provides an overview on the developments of new forms of art in the early 20th century, in particular around Munich and Murnau with the members of “Der Blaue Reiter” group (Heinrich Campendonk, August Macke, Franz Marc, Alexej von Jawlensky, Wassily Kandinsky, Gabriele Münter and Marianne von Werefkin); with the artists operating in northern Germany (Emil Nolde, Hermann Max Pechstein, Ernst Ludwig Kirchner, Erich Heckel and Otto Müller), and also the “Bauhaus” masters such as Lyonel Feininger and Paul Klee.